CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. The vast majority of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work, and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

Beginner

What should you look for in a good EA?

We all have our own preferences for which EA they would like to trial and put to use, but there are a few things to consider. 

  1. Past performance: how has the EA performed in the past? Over what time period is the performance shown? (longer the better) And what level of risk and return has it exhibited?
  2. What is the maximum drawdown on the EA? This is very important, as you need to determine if higher levels of drawdown suit your risk appetite. Fluctuations of 70-80% of the value of your account can be dangerous.
  3. Cost: if you’re buying an off the shelf EA, it needs to be within your budget. Just like any investment, no EA can guarantee future performance. While past performance may prove an EA’s reliability, you need to consider how quickly the cost of the EA will be recouped given your account size and the EA’s forecasted trading performance.
  4. Developer support: are the contact details of the developer or company easily found, and can you find tutorials or guides on how to troubleshoot issues with the EA? It’s important to find this out, especially for higher priced EAs which could prove costly if they don’t work as intended.
  5. Reviews: does the EA have a very good rating (5 stars obviously the preference) and are there sufficient, legitimate reviews available to determine whether the EA does in fact perform as described?
  6. Trusted platforms: purchasing through the MQL5 marketplace (for MT4 & MT5 EAs) and the cTrader algo marketplace are probably the best options, given the platform providers will monitor them for any suspicious behaviour. While you can purchase EAs outside of these marketplaces, it is best to do rigorous research on the EA you intend to buy, and ask for a free trial where possible so you can conduct your own analysis.
Pepperstone doesn’t represent that the material provided here is accurate, current or complete, and therefore shouldn’t be relied upon as such. The information provided here, whether from a third party or not, isn’t to be considered as a recommendation; or an offer to buy or sell; or the solicitation of an offer to buy or sell any security, financial product or instrument; or to participate in any particular trading strategy. We advise any readers of this content to seek their own advice. Without the approval of Pepperstone, reproduction or redistribution of this information isn’t permitted.